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Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

3 edition of Ethnobiological studies in the American Southwest: II. found in the catalog.

Ethnobiological studies in the American Southwest: II.

Edward Franklin Castetter

Ethnobiological studies in the American Southwest: II.

The ethnobiology of the Papago Indians.

by Edward Franklin Castetter

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Published by University of New Mexico Press in Albuquerque .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Microfiche. Ann Arbor, Mich., University Microfilms, 19--. 1 microfiche ; 11 x 15 cm. (Human relations area files, HRAF)

StatementBy Edward F. Castetter and Ruth Murray Underhill
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination84 p
Number of Pages84
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15135277M

number , Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest, II; Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.] THE PAPAGO INDIANS OF ARIZONA AND THEIR RELATIVES THE PIMA. By Ruth Underhill. New York: AMS Press, Illus., suggested readings, 68 pages. $ (hard cover). [Reprint of Sherman Pamphlets, no. 3; Lawrence, Kansas: Education Divi-. Drawing on a wide range of cultural productions including novels, films, paintings, comic strips, and historical studies, this groundbreaking book explores the Southwest as both a real and a culturally constructed site of migration and encounter, in which the very identities of "alien" and "native" shift with each act of travel.

HOWES, P. G. The giant cactus forest and its world: A brief biology of the giant cactus forest of our American Southwest. Duell, Sloan & Pearce, New York. pp. HUBBARD, H. G. Insect fauna of the giant cactus of Arizona: Letters from the Southwest. Psyche 8(Suppl. 1) JAMES, J. F. Botanical notes from Tucson. Am. Look in the phone book under “United States Government.” The Natural Resources Conservation Service will be listed under the subheading “Department of Agriculture.” Ethnobiological Studies in American Southwest II. The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians. Univ. of New Mexico Bull. 4(3): Dirr, M. A. Manual of Woody.

  Utilized among early indigenous groups throughout the American Southwest and northern Mexico, seeds and greens of the genus Chenopodium (goosefoot) were frequently gathered for their medicinal and nutritive value (Castetter & Underhill ; Castetter & Opler ; Ebeling ). Jane Archer is a best-selling author who writes historical novels. She combined a novelist's skills with extensive research to write this book of ancient stories. This book was found at an Austin Public Library. Bell, Willis, and Edward Castetter. "Ethnobiological Studies in The American Southwest.".


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Ethnobiological studies in the American Southwest: II by Edward Franklin Castetter Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ethpobiological Studies In the American Southwest II. The Ethnobiology 0/the Papago Indians By EDWARD F. CASTETTER, Professor of Biology, University of New Mexico and RUTH M. UNDERHILL, Research Assistant in Anthropology, Barnard College, Columbia University THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO BULLETIN Whole Number Octo > Biological Cited by: Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest.

The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest. The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians. Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest.

Uncultivated Native Plants Used as Sources of Food by Edward F. Castetter; Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest. The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians by Edward F. Castetter, Ruth M. Underhill; Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest.

III. Castetter, Edward F. and Ruth M. Underhill Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest II. The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians. University of New Mexico Bulletin 4(3) (p.

28) Romero, John Bruno The Botanical Lore of the California Indians. New York. Vantage Press, Inc. 28). Author of Pima and Papago Indian agriculture, The ethnobiology of the Papago Indians, Yuman Indian agriculture: primitive subsistence on the lower Colorado and Gila Rivers, Ethnobiological studies in the American Southwest.

(Castetter, Edward F. and Ruth M. Underhill,Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest II. The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4 (3), pages 16) Papago Food, Unspecified detail.

The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians. Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest. Vol. The University of New Mexico Bulletin, Biological Series 4(3). Albuquerque. Curtin L. By the Prophet of the Earth: Ethnobotany of the Pima. Reprint of book published by San Vicente Foundation [].

University of Arizona Press. Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest, II: The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians. University of New Mexico Bulletin, no.Biological Series, vol. 4, no. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque.

Chamberlin *1 Chamberlin, R. Some Plant Names of the Ute Indians. Reprinted. Kraus Reprint, New York. Ethnobiological studies in the American Southwest, II; University of New Mexico bulletin no.

N no.l Castetter, Edward Franklin. Uncultivated native plants used as sources of food. The University of New Mexico Bulletin, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest, part 6, whole number 92p.

Very good (near fine!) paperback. Nº de ref. del artículo: Castetter, Edward F. and Ruth M. Underhill Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest II. The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians.

University of New Mexico Bulletin 4(3) (p. 65) Please return to our main Ethnobotany of southern California page. Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest: VI. The Early Utilization and Distribution of Agave in the American Southwest (The University Museum Bulletin, Biological Series, Volume 5, Number 4) on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest: VI. The Early Utilization and Distribution of Agave in the American Southwest Format: Paperback. Morris Edward Opler (May 3, – ), American anthropologist and advocate of Japanese American civil rights, was born in Buffalo, New was the brother of Marvin Opler, an anthropologist and social psychiatrist.

Morris Opler's chief anthropological contribution is in the ethnography of Southern Athabaskan peoples, i.e. the Navajo and Apache, such as the Chiricahua. Get this from a library. Ethnobiological studies in the American Southwest.

III: the ethnobiology of the Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache. The use of plants for foods, beverages and narcotics. [Edward Franklin Castetter; Morris Edward Opler]. Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest. Vol. The University of New Mexico Bulletin, Biological Series 4(3).

Albuquerque. Curtin, Leonora S. By the Prophet of the Earth: Ethnobotany of the Pima. Reprint of book published by San Vicente Foundation []. University of Arizona Press. Tucson. Elmore, Francis H. Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest I. Uncultivated Native Plants Usedas Sources ofFood By EDWARD F.

CASTETTER THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO:BULLETIN Whole Number Biological Series, Vol. 4, No. 1 Published twice a month by the University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest Vi: The Early Utilization and the Distribution of Agve in the American Southwest.

Castetter, Alvin R. Grove, Willis H. Bell. Quantitative analysis of the saguaro population. Unpublished report. 99 pp. CAIN, S. Foundations of plant geography. Harper & Brothers, New York. and W. BELL. Ethnobiological studies in the American Southwest.

The aboriginal utilization of the tall cacti in the American Southwest. Univ. New Mexico Bull. Ethnobiological Studies in American Southwest V: The Ulitization of the Mesquite and Screwbean by the Aborigines in the American Southwest.

Willis Bell, Edward F. Castetter. (tDAR id: ) book Language English Location SCIC, SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN DIEGO, CA [BELLW 01] tDAR ID About. News. Native American peoples developed a sophisticated plant‐based medical system in the ten millennia before the European conquest of America.

Although there were significant differences between the systems developed by the many native groups, about which many fine works have been written, there were also many broad similarities which will be detailed here.

The volume is attractively bound in cloth, and for lay readers especially, constitutes an interesting addition to the “Civilization of the American Indian” series which the University of Oklahoma Press is publishing.

ERMINIE VOECELIN W. GREENCASTLE, INDIANA Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest.Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest.

I. Uncultivated Native Plants Used as Sources of Food. ; Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest. II. The Ethnobiology of the.Castetter, Edward F. and Ruth M.

Underhill,Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest II. The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians. University of New Mexico Bulletin 4(3) .